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2017 Internship for Local/International Students UN Information Center in I.R. Iran, Tehran (Part-time with flexible schedule, unpaid)

The United Nations Information Center (UNIC) is the public voice of the UN and the principal source of information about the United Nations system. It promotes global awareness and greater understanding of the work of the UN, using various communication tools including press, electronic and new media. More information about UNIC activities is available at www.unic-ir.org. The incumbents will work under the general supervision of the UNIC Director and under direct supervision of the UNIC Reference Assistant. The purpose of internships at UNIC is not to lead to further employment with the UN but to complement an intern’s studies.  

DURATION:                           Six months

APPLICATION DEADLINE: 08 April 2017

LOCATION:                           UN Information Centre, UN Office, Tehran, I.R. Iran

START DATE:                      01 May 2017

 

ABOUT: The United Nations Information Center (UNIC) is the public voice of the UN and the principal source of information about the United Nations system. It promotes global awareness and greater understanding of the work of the UN, using various communication tools including press, electronic and new media. More information about UNIC activities is available at www.unic-ir.org.

                  

The incumbents will work under the general supervision of the UNIC Director and under direct supervision of the UNIC Reference Assistant.

 

The purpose of internships at UNIC is not to lead to further employment with the UN but to complement an intern’s studies.

 

 

GENERAL RESPONSIBILITIES:

  • provide support to the UNIC office in organizing meetings, press events, and other activities
  • take photos and make videos during UN events
  • provide administrative support to the UNIC staff
  • assist UNIC staff with website and social media maintenance
  • undertaking any other relevant tasks when necessary

 

MANDATORY SKILLS:

  • Basic knowledge about United Nations, its global and national agenda
  • Basic knowledge about work of the UN in the I.R. Iran and UNIC in the I.R. Iran
  • Fluent knowledge of Persian and English languages
  • Computer literate in standard software applications, including knowledge of MS Office, internet, and social media
  • Knowledge of political, social and economic environment of the I.R. Iran
  • Ability to meet deadlines, prioritize and maintain a flexible schedule
  • Personal responsibility, accuracy and punctuality
  • Ability to work in a team as well as individually
  • Respect  UN office ethics
  • Respect gender and cultural diversity

 


SPECIFIC TASKS:

 

1.   Translations:


Responsibilities:

  • translate UN documents from English into Persian and vice versa
  • transcribe and translate UN films

Required Skills:

  • strong translation and writing skills
  • very good knowledge of English and Persian
  • ability to edit translated texts

 

2.   Media monitoring/press clippings and social media:


Responsibilities:

·         review local media and contribute to preparation of press clippings

·         monitor media coverage of the UN activities in Iran

·         contribute to the updates of the UN Iran social media platforms

Required Skills:

·         knowledge of Persian and English language is mandatory

·         basic knowledge of media field in Iran

·         advanced social media skills

 

3.   Research:

 

Responsibilities:

·         contribute to the content for updating the bilingual www.unic-ir.org website

·         research and compile new materials

Required Skills:

·         sound knowledge of international relations, international humanitarian law

·         good bilingual writing and research skills

 

4.   Design and photography:

 

Responsibilities:

  • assist with design of UN-related publications, promotional materials
  • prepare photos for website and publications (photo-editing)
  • take photos during UN events

Required Skills:

  • knowledge of editing and design software (Photoshop, illustrator, in-design, etc)
  • knowledge of some open source subtitling software
  • knowledge of info graphics and other multimedia software

 

5.   Administrative and outreach/library work:

 

Responsibilities:

  • provide support to UNIC in maintaining the library files and lists
  • assist in organizing workshops, meetings, press events, and other activities

Required Skills:

  • willingness to work as a multitasked aide in the office
  • skills and experience in filing and other office duties


HOW TO APPLY

 

4th –year undergraduate students and above with a background of international relations, international law, humanitarian law, international economics, political science, English language, communications and journalism, graphic-design, film production and other relevant studies are eligible to apply.

 

Each applicant should submit the following papers to UNIC via e-mail: This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

1.   Curriculum vitae in English

2.   Motivation letter in English

 

  • Please write in the subject line of e-mail: Internship application”. 
  • Please mention in the body of e-mail TASKS, from the list above, in which you are interested.

 

Application packages will be reviewed on a competitive basis by UNIC staff and ONLY the best candidates will be contacted and invited to take part in a UN test and interview.

 

Shortlisted candidates will have a probation period of two weeks. Only after successful completion of this period the applicants are accepted for internship for an initial period of three months with a possible extension up to six months. Mid-term evaluation will be important. 

 

UNIC will give a concrete task or list of tasks to each intern to perform.  

 

The intern should sign an Internship Agreement committing him or herself to the rules and tasks mentioned.

 

The interns will be provided with office space and internet access. Some might have the opportunity to work distantly, outside the office area.

 

Upon successful completion of the internship and based on the evaluation the incumbents will be provided with a Letter of Reference.

 

Note:

 

1.   To the information of the applicants and university administration: the internship period might not coincide with the mandatory academic practice of the respective university. That is why UNIC will accept MAINLY those students who are voluntarily willing to be at UNIC as interns.

 

2.   UNIC is committed to achieving workforce diversity in terms of gender, nationality and culture. Individuals from minority groups and persons with disabilities are equally encouraged to apply. All applications will be treated with confidence.

 

3.   As the office space and human resources are very limited in the UNIC office only small number of students will be accepted. Interns are not financially remunerated by the UN. The UN accepts no responsibility for the medical insurance of the intern or costs arising from injury, illness or death that may occur during an internship. The UN accepts no responsibility for loss or damage to personal effects that may occur during the internship.

 

 

4.   The intern agrees that he/she will work for a minimum of at least three months with two weeks probation period.  Working hours are flexible and will be agreed with each person individually. An internship must be completed within a six-month period. 

 

 

 
 
 

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UN Secretary-General's remarks at Nowruz Celebration, 21 March 2017

Happy Nowruz to everyone!I am grateful to the Ambassadors from a dozen countries celebrating Nowruz for bringing us together today. Thank you for enabling the United Nations to be part of this timeless ceremony. Nowruz is a new beginning. A new year. A chance to be with family and friends. The United Nations family celebrates Nowruz because this holiday has meaning for the whole world. Nowruz is a reminder of all that we have in common – and the richness of our diversity.  

President of the General Assembly,
Ambassadors, Excellencies,
Ladies and Gentlemen,


Happy Nowruz to everyone!

I am grateful to the Ambassadors from a dozen countries celebrating Nowruz for bringing us together today.

Thank you for enabling the United Nations to be part of this timeless ceremony.

Nowruz is a new beginning. A new year. A chance to be with family and friends.

The United Nations family celebrates Nowruz because this holiday has meaning for the whole world.

Nowruz is a reminder of all that we have in common – and the richness of our diversity. 

I understand that later a video will be shown featuring how different communities celebrate Nowruz. They each find their own beautiful way to express our shared values.

And the feasts of Nowruz have so many symbolic items, including sprouted wheat to symbolize Springtime.

About a millennium ago, the poet Nasir-i Khusraw – I believe he was born in Iran and lived [a] large part of his life in what’s today Tajikistan – wrote about this inspiring transition to a new season.

He said, “Spring has come – the air is cool and fresh and the aged world is young again.” 

So we are all young on Nowruz!

And the poet points out that the grass and trees are revived thanks to their seeds. And he teaches that for man, “Knowledge is the seed.”

This is a profound lesson inspired by Nowruz: Knowledge renews us.

Nowruz is a time to learn about each other and our world.

It is a chance to renew our pledge for peace, friendship, human rights and human dignity.

I wish all families and communities that celebrate a prosperous, happy, healthy and peaceful Nowruz.

Let us mark this new beginning with fresh resolve for our world.

Thank you.

Nowruz Mubarak. 
***

Lake Urmia comes back to life slowly but surely

Life has returned to the dying Salt Lake in North-West Iran. The effort to restore what had been broken is succeeding. Returning to the barren landscape after almost four years, I was able to see water. Not nearly enough, but much more than last time. The lake is reviving. And this revival is the result of an immensely successful collaborative effort involving many players – some Iranian, some foreign. Lake Urmia was once Iran’s largest lake. In its prime, it was the second largest saltwater lake in the world. But years of man-made disruption – from the frenzy of 60 years of dam-building to the massive over-use of feeder rivers – had diverted the natural flow of sweet water from the surrounding basin into the salty lake.

By Gary Lewis, UN Resident Coordinator and UNDP Resident Representative

Life has returned to the dying Salt Lake in North-West Iran. The effort to restore what had been broken is succeeding.

Returning to the barren landscape after almost four years, I was able to see water. Not nearly enough, but much more than last time. The lake is reviving. And this revival is the result of an immensely successful collaborative effort involving many players – some Iranian, some foreign.

Lake Urmia was once Iran’s largest lake. In its prime, it was the second largest saltwater lake in the world. But years of man-made disruption – from the frenzy of 60 years of dam-building to the massive over-use of feeder rivers – had diverted the natural flow of sweet water from the surrounding basin into the salty lake. As a result, it simply dried out. It died at the hands of humans.

And here are some of the pictures of that long and painful death I captured in October 2013.
 

 

I remember standing on a dead, flat, salt bed – which is what the exposed bottom of the lake has become. The water had all gone. But the wind hadn’t. And that gusting wind was whipping up all the exposed salt granules and blowing them into my face, into my lungs and onto the agricultural lands which surround the lake. It was like what I imagined a scene from the planet Mars might resemble.

I recall asking myself what living in this dust-bowl would be like – day-in and day-out – for the residents and farmers in the Lake Urmia Basin.
 

 

I also remember thinking that if the lake dried up two main things would happen. One is that salt from the dried lake bed would blow around and get dumped on farming land and crops in what essentially becomes a salt dustbowl in a fairly large radius around the lake. Secondly, we could expect people to get sick. For example, in the vicinity of the dried-out Aral Sea in Central Asia, we already see people afflicted with allergies and respiratory diseases including cancers.

But there would be a third self-destructive phenomenon at play as well. As farmers drilled ever-deeper to pump out the aquifers at the side of the lake for farming, over-exploitation of this groundwater surrounding the lake would cause saltwater seepage into those very same wells. This would hit people’s access to potable drinking water. So we were threatened by a “perfect salt storm” affecting people’s health and livelihoods.

When our plane landed in Urmia two weeks ago, having taken the normal one hour to fly from Tehran, I wondered what I would see. I had heard tell of an improvement. But such stories often vanish in the face of requests to provide evidence. I wanted to see for myself. It was when we started to approach the vast open expanse of lake bed that I saw the morning sun glimmering off something which had not been there when last I travelled to the lake.

Water. Not deep. But enough to cover the salt dust granules which had caused such havoc before. As we drove across the bridge which bisects the lake, the glimmering started to stretch out towards the rising sun.

Here is what I saw this morning.
 

 

I must confess I was so happy that tears were welling up in my eyes.  The environmental problems we create can be fixed, I thought.  And here is how it happened. 

First, some numbers.

When lake Urmia was full, say 20 years ago, it was estimated to contain around 30 billion cubic meters (bcm) of water.  At the worst point, 3 to 4 years ago, it accounted for a mere 0.5 bcm of salt water.  The number now stands at 2.5 bcm.  The deadly decline has been reversed.  The amount of water now keeps increasing month on month. 

Because the amount of annual precipitation in terms of rain and snow in the basin has not changed appreciably in the last few years, we must look elsewhere for an explanation of why the lake is now filling up. 

There are three main reasons.  The first is engineering works to help unblock and un-silt the feeder rivers.  Second is the deliberate release of water from the dams in the surrounding hills.  Third, and most difficult of all to accomplish, has been a change in the way water management in the basin happens – especially among farmers.  Other approaches like banning illegal wells have also had an impact.

Here are some more numbers.  Three to four years ago, when the water level was at its worst, only 500 of Lake Urmia’s 5,000 square kilometer surface was covered by any water at all.  That figure has now risen to 2,300 square kilometers.  Admittedly, much of that water is spread extremely thin, and some tends to evaporate easily.  But it is there, offering a protective covering for the estimated 6 billion tons of salt and dust, which now no longer finds its way so easily into the air, into our eyes and lungs, and onto the farmers’ crops.

This third approach – better water management – took considerable time and effort to achieve.  But it appears here to stay.  While practicing new roles and partnership of local authorities and communities within LU restoration process, It took painstaking effort to get farmers to reconsider how they grow their crops by modifying their agricultural techniques when growing wheat, barley, rapeseed and fruit and vegetables. 

The new techniques are astonishingly simple: changing farm dimensions to make for smaller plots which retain water better; not using flooding as a form of irrigation, but rather trickle-irrigation which is targeted at the crops and thus not wasted; avoiding deep tillage which causes unnecessary water loss; introducing drought-resistant crop strains; ploughing plant residue back into the soil rather than burning it.

Across the board, in some cases the crop yield – despite using less water – has also increased by 40 per cent.

Here is a final reassuring set of numbers.  Considering the normal hydrological conditions, the lake has an average of 5.4 meters and Max. depth in northern part around 15 meters.  When the lake was at its worst point, the lake’s average level had dropped to almost zero.  When we compare the level of the lake taken now with what prevailed at exactly this time last year, we note a 6 centimeter rise.  The monthly increases have been incremental, but sustained.

The project which has brought about the improved water management is being implemented by the UN Development Programme (UNDP).  Based in West and East Azerbaijan provinces with a focus on Lake Urmia surrounding cities and villages, it works closely with local farmers, provincial and national governments and others to initiate an adaptation process by implementing the “ecosystem approach”

Following a 7 year project to introduce ecosystem approach for saving Lake Urmia,  with the generous financial support from the Japanese government in recent years, as well as an inflow from the Iranian government’s own resources at both the national and provincial levels, these techniques have been successfully implemented in 90 villages.  But this number represents only about 10% of the irrigated farming area in the Urmia Basin.  Nonetheless, in the areas where the sustainable agriculture is being practiced, there is a water saving of about one-third of the water that would otherwise have been wasted under the old inefficient practices.  This saved water can flow back into the lake, thereby replenishing it.

UNDP’s interventions to save Iranian wetlands including Lake Urmia – starting 12 years ago, but intensifying significantly with the addition of 3 phases of Japanese funds – have focused on working with local farmers, cooperatives and government to support a new model of partnership among stakeholders and initiate an adaptation process by implementing sustainable agriculture techniques.  It has also advocated alternative livelihoods for women using micro-credit and biodiversity conservation. 

At present the project’s interventions cover sites all around the lake, and most affected, part of the lake basin.  To boost coverage from 10%, the plan is to move towards significant upscaling of this important initiative in an emblematic effort which is being recognized at an international level.

As I got on the plane to return home to Tehran in the evening, three takeaway lessons occurred to me. 

First, we face powerful environmental challenges in Iran.  But we can fix what we have broken.  And this is happening – right now – in Lake Urmia. 

Second, the public must educate itself and speak out on the environment.  The UN received a petition in 2016, containing 1.7 million signatures, requesting action on Lake Urmia.  The pressure has been relentless.  Such pressure must be welcomed and acted upon.

Third, in the final analysis, these environmental problems cannot be solved if we act alone.  The Lake Urmia response shows that it takes leadership by public authorities, acting in collaboration with the affected communities, and sometimes with support from the international community (technical support from UNDP and financial support from a partner like Japan) to do the trick.

What has happened in Lake Urmia is an example to inspire us all – both within and beyond Iran.

 

 
 
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Students of Tourism learn more about the UN and SDGs

TEHRAN- UNIC together with Parto Tourism Institute organized “Finding UN Information and Documentation” workshop for some 35 university students of tourism who are members of the institute. The theme of the workshop which was held at the UN building on 14 March 2017 was on tourism, cultural heritage and handicrafts with a focus on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). UNIC Reference Assistant Ms. Nazanin Ghaemmaghmi elaborated on basic facts about the UN, UN General Assembly and its resolutions on UN observances including the one which named 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development as well as World Tourism Day (27 September).  
Finding UN information and documentation workshop participants

TEHRAN- UNIC together with Parto Tourism Institute organized “Finding UN Information and Documentation” workshop for some 35 university students of tourism who are members of the institute. The theme of the workshop which was held at the UN building on 14 March 2017 was on tourism, cultural heritage and handicrafts with a focus on Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

UNIC Reference Assistant Ms. Nazanin Ghaemmaghmi elaborated on basic facts about the UN, UN General Assembly and its resolutions on UN observances including the one which named 2017 as the International Year of Sustainable Tourism for Development as well as World Tourism Day (27 September).

 

Ms. Nazanin Ghaemmaghami briefing the participants during the workshop

Then she briefed the participants on high-level meetings of General Assembly in 2015, namely Sustainable Development Summit and Sustainable Development Goals. Among the 17 goals, she focused on goal 8 target 9, goal 12 target 10 and goal 14 target 7 which are dealing with tourism. The participants also navigated through the websites of UNWTO, UNESCO and UNEP. 

Ms. Soraya Jamali Nazari as the Managing Director of the Institute and the professor of the students who organized the session, expressed her own and the participants’ satisfaction from the workshop and thanked UNIC for the cooperation with the Institute.

 

Finding UN information and documentation workshop participants

Workshops “Finding UN Information and Documentation” are regularly organized by the UNIC for all interested groups. For more information about how to attend these workshops and learn how to navigate the UN web site, please contact UN Information Center: Reference Assistant Ms. Nazanin Ghaemmaghami (e-mail: nazanin.This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.'; document.getElementById('cloak72419').innerHTML += ''+addy_text72419+'<\/a>'; //-->  – Tel. No.: 0098 21- 22873837)

 

 
 

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Inauguration of “Iranian Women” photo exhibition

TEHRAN - UNIC Director Maria Dotsenko, Vice-President for Women and Family Affairs Dr. Shahindokht Molaverdi and Managing Director of the Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) Dr. Mohammad Khoddadi spoke at the inaugural ceremony of “Iranian Women” photo exhibition at the Milad tower in Tehran on 11 March 2017.  
From right to left: Ms. Molaverdi, Ms. Rafati from IRNA and Ms. Dotsenko inaugurating the Iranian Women photo exhibition

TEHRAN - UNIC Director Maria Dotsenko, Vice-President for Women and Family Affairs Dr. Shahindokht Molaverdi and Managing Director of the Islamic Republic News Agency (IRNA) Dr. Mohammad Khoddadi spoke at the inaugural ceremony of “Iranian Women” photo exhibition at the Milad tower in Tehran on 11 March 2017.  

 

From left to right: Khoddadi, Dotsenko and Molaverdi

Ms. Dotsenko delivered the SG’s message on International Women’s Day. In her speech Vice-President Dr. Molaverdi spoke about important role which Iranian women play in the political, economic and social spheres of life and called for expansion of Iranian women’s participation in different fields in particularly in political arenas.

She underlined that 10 per cent of the Iran Cabinet members are women, adding the presence of women has also been doubled in Iran's parliament.
 

 

Dotsenko and Molaverdi touring the exhibition
Jointly organized by the office of Vice-President for Women and Family Affairs and IRNA, the exhibition displays 80 photos taken by IRNA’s photojournalists depicting the leading role Iranian women have been playing in everyday life in recent years.

The IRNA Managing Director Dr. Khoddadi in his remarks hailed role of women in elevating the Iranian society.

“The Iranian women proved their roles in progress of society by active participation in all fields, and they proved that if they want, they can, “he added.
 
 
 
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